Hand & Arm Veins


hands

Hand Vein Treatment


The appearance of the hand is a tell-tale sign of aging. While the skin and face receive much of our attention, the hands often go neglected. As we grow older, skin elasticity decreases, and we lose fat tissue on the back of the hand causing veins on the hand to bulge and be more visible.

Northwest Vein & Aesthetic Center offers sclerotherapy to treat bulging hand veins. This is a 15-20 minute procedure performed in the office that seals and collapses bulging veins. The hand is wrapped with a compression dressing and normal activity is resumed immediately. Prior to treatment, it is essential to undergo a brief evaluation to ensure your hands have adequate drainage and can support treatment. If your hands veins are a concern, contact us for a free evaluation.

Arm Vein Treatment


Compared to the legs, arm veins issues are much less common. Nonetheless, arm veins can be afflicted by problems such as phlebitis or blood clots. In addition, a condition unique to arm veins is Venous Thoracic Outlet Syndrome. Also known as Paget-Schröetter Syndrome or Axillosubclavian Vein Thrombosis, the syndrome occurs when the main vein of the arm becomes squeezed in the area of the shoulder called the thoracic outlet, a triangular opening formed by the collar bone, rib bone and scalene muscle. As blood cannot pass through the bottleneck, clotting occurs leading to arm swelling, discoloration and discomfort. Skin surface veins become engorged and more visible as they work overtime to compensate for the clotted axillosubclavian vein. Venous Thoracic Outlet Syndrome classically involves the dominant arm in young adults, often while they are engaged in strenuous or repetitive activities using the arms – sports, playing a musical instruments, or even typing on a keyboard.

Venous Thoracic Outlet is successfully treated with blood thinners and a minimally invasive endovascular procedure to reopen the clotted vein. Following the minimally invasive procedure, many specialists advocate surgery to remove the first rib and widen narrowed thoracic outlet in order to prevent repeat compression, but excellent long term results even without surgery has been reported.